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Urban historians reveal new research about the origins of redlining

On the "Sound of Ideas" we discuss new research questioning some commonly held beliefs about famous redlining maps. [Olivier Le Queinec/shutterstock]
On the "Sound of Ideas" we discuss new research questioning some commonly held beliefs about famous redlining maps. [Olivier Le Queinec/shutterstock]

It is well-known that redlining, the historically discriminatory lending practice, has had a huge impact on home values in predominantly Black neighborhoods and on residents' ability to obtain loans in cities across the country and in Northeast Ohio. But new research is shedding light on this widespread banking policy and is questioning some commonly held beliefs about the famous redlining maps that segmented neighborhoods in Cleveland and other cities.

We'll start the "Sound of Ideas" today by speaking with Todd Michney, associate professor of Urban History at Georgia Tech, about new research into the origins of the well-known redlining maps that shows that what we thought we knew about the practice isn't entirely accurate. 

Dr. Michney, who is originally from the Cleveland area, is currently researching the origins of redlining and other racially discriminatory housing policies during the New Deal era. He is also the author of the book, "Surrogate Suburbs: Black Upward Mobility and Neighborhood Change in Cleveland 1900-1980."

He joins the program to discuss his work, as well as Stephanie Czekalinski, a digital editor on our health team, who has produced a number of stories on redlining and health outcomes in Northeast Ohio. 

Later in the hour, we'll learn just how much it costs to raise a child from 0-18. The answer: a lot.

-Todd Michney, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Urban History, Georgia Institute of Technology & Author, Surrogate Suburbs: Black Upward Mobility and Neighborhood Change in Cleveland

-Stephanie Czekalinski, Digital Editor, Ideastream Public Media 

-Isabel Sawhill, Ph.D., Senior Fellow in Economic Studies, Brookings Institution 

rachel.rood@ideastream.org | 216-916-6246