Why are heat waves happening around the world and how to keep safe?

On the "Sound of Ideas," we discuss why heat waves are happening around the world and learn about heat safety. [Ed Connor/shutterstock]
On the "Sound of Ideas," we discuss why heat waves are happening around the world and learn about heat safety. [Ed Connor/shutterstock]
Featured Audio

It's getting really hot out there. Last week we saw temperatures break records across the world. 
In the United Kingdom, temperatures hit 104 degrees, 30 degrees hotter than it usually is in their summer - and where less than five percent of homes are estimated to have air conditioning.

Experts cite roughly two thousand deaths in Spain and Portugal, from heat-related causes.
That's over the course of a week and a half from the 7th to the 18th of this month. 

In the United States, about 100 million Americans were placed under heat advisories and warnings from the National Weather Service, including parts or all of 28 states. 

Southwest and West Central Ohio were included in the heat advisory last week, warnings posted of a heat index of up to 105 degrees. 

This hour, we'll spend the majority of the show talking about heat. First is talking about what is causing these heat waves to occur more commonly, and then we'll talk about how to keep you and your loved ones safer during one.  
 

Guests: 

- Philip Taylor, PhD, Perkins Professor of Physics Emeritus, Case Western Reserve University
- Purva Grover, MD, Medical Director, Cleveland Clinic Children's Pediatric Emergency Departments
- Natisha Bowling, VP of Youth Development, YMCA of Greater Cleveland 

- R. Mark Giuliano, DM, Author, Making It Home: & Pastor of the Montgomery Presbyterian Church

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