What Do We Know Now About COVID-19?

On The Sound of Ideas, we discuss what we know now about the coronavirus pandemic. [Angelina Bambina/shutterstock]
On The Sound of Ideas, we discuss what we know now about the coronavirus pandemic. [Angelina Bambina/shutterstock]

On Friday, Ohio set another record with more than 8,000 new coronavirus cases, causing Governor Mike DeWine to tweet, "We are facing a monumental crisis in Ohio." Then there were more than seven thousand additional cases on each of Saturday and Sunday.

68 of 88 counties are now listed as red, the second highest in the state's public health advisory system, up from 56 counties the week prior. And all 88 counties remain at "high incidence" as defined by the Centers for Disease Control. The decision over whether to again close down bars, restaurants and gyms, could come as early as this Thursday. 

Ohio is currently at the highest point for both hospitalized and ICU patients since the beginning of the pandemic. And it is not clear whether the latest numbers will reduce that trend in the near future. And with the days getting colder, and Thanksgiving next week, there's every possibility that cases will continue to increase, as people congregate indoors. Nationally, no better, as the U.S. yesterday passed the eleven million mark in confirmed cases, with total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported this morning at 246,217. 

Nearly one quarter million dead Americans. 1,165 of those in Cuyahoga, Summit, Lorain, and Lake counties.

But if we want to think positively - there is word this morning of a second very promising test result for a vaccine, which, combined with one we knew of last week - could speed up innoculation rates.. 

This hour on The Sound of Ideas, we want to talk not just about the vaccines, and the horrific numbers, but about what those numbers mean for people who are diagnosed with COVID-19. We're now eight months since the original shutdowns, nearly ten months into the pandemic, and there is a lot more that we know about the disease now, than we did, even in the summer.

New research is released seemingly every day about how the disease affects people, what are the lasting impacts, and what COVID-19 does to the body. 

We'll get answers to our coronavirus questions from two infectious disease specialists. And later in the show, we'll talk about the ongoing legal fight over the results of the 2020 election.

Guests: 

-Tara Smith, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology, Kent State University 
-Dr. Kristin Englund, MD, Infectious Disease Specialist, The Cleveland Clinic

-John Green, Ph.D., Director Emeritus Ray C. Bliss Institute of Applied Politics, University of Akron
-Danielle Sarver Coombs, Ph.D., Professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Kent State University 

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