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Ken Burns’s two-part, four-hour documentary, "Benjamin Franklin," explores the revolutionary life of one of the18th century's most consequential and compelling personalities, whose work and words unlocked the mystery of electricity and helped create the United States.

Benjamin Franklin helps craft the Declaration of Independence and wins French support.
Get an inside look from Ken Burns on the making of Benjamin Franklin.
This bonus scene features Benjamin Franklin House in London, his only surviving residence.
Corporate funding for BENJAMIN FRANKLIN was provided by Bank of America. Major funding was provided by David M. Rubenstein. Major funding was also provided by The Pew Charitable Trusts, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and by The Better Angels Society and its members Jeannie and Jonathan Lavine; University of Pennsylvania; Gilchrist and Amy Berg; Perry and Donna Golkin; Kissick Family Foundation; Deborah and Jon Dawson; Diane and Hal Brierley; McCloskey Family Charitable Trust; Cappy and Janie McGarr; Lavender Butterfly Fund; and Susan and Charles Shanor Charitable Trust.
Episodes
After success as a Philadelphia printer Benjamin Franklin earns worldwide fame in science.
After success as a Philadelphia printer Benjamin Franklin earns worldwide fame in science.
Extras
Filmmakers and special guests explore Franklin's writing in this virtual event series.
Filmmakers and special guests explore Franklin's writing in this virtual event series.
Filmmakers and special guests explore Franklin's writing in this virtual event series.
Filmmakers and special guests explore Franklin's writing in this virtual event series.
Ken Burns speaks with Mandy Patinkin and Michael Douglas.
Franklin’s popular "Poor Richard’s Almanack" offered an enduring brand of American humor.
A month after the end of the battle, Franklin finally got the news from Yorktown.
Late in life, Franklin petitioned Congress to end slavery in the United States.
As impasse threatened the Constitutional Convention, Franklin appealed for Compromise.
Franklin and Adams have to share a bedroom in a humorous scene not in the final film.