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There's another spike in Ohio's COVID case numbers

 Ohio Dept of Health Director Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff
Jo Ingles
/
Statehouse News Bureau
Ohio Dept of Health Director Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff urges anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 using an instant, at-home, antigen test to follow up with a full PCR test. These tests are being used to determine variants in Ohio's cases.

The most recent COVID case numbers from the Ohio Department of Health show more than 9,000 positive and confirmed cases of the virus. Ohio Health Department Director Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff says the case numbers from the past couple of days are rising.

“These numbers are comparable to what we saw at the peak of our fall surge. Indeed the last time we saw case numbers this high was on September 10," Vanderhoff said.

Thursday's COVID-19 numbers
Ohio Department of Health
/
Ohio Department of Health
Thursday's COVID-19 numbers

Vanderhoff says there are no confirmed cases of the new Omicron variant in Ohio yet, but he urges anyone who gets a positive result in an instant, at-home, antigen test to follow up with a full PCR test. He says those tests are being used to determine variants in Ohio’s cases.

Vanderhoff urges anyone who is coughing or sneezing to get a COVID test before going out in public. Free instant, at-home, COVID tests are available at local libraries and health departments statewide.
Copyright 2021 The Statehouse News Bureau. To see more, visit The Statehouse News Bureau.

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.