Coronavirus Questions Answered: When Can Choirs Sing Again?

Indoor choir practices may spread the virus more quickly. [Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock]
Indoor choir practices may spread the virus more quickly. [Monkey Business Images / Shutterstock]

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Ruth from Shaker Heights is a musician involved with choral and instrumental groups. She's concerned that these activities may spread COVID-19, and she asks when it will be safe to sing and play instruments together again.

University Hospitals’ Dr. Keith Armitage said until there is an effective vaccine or treatment, normal activities like choir practices should not take place.

“The idea of an indoor choir practice just seems unlikely until we reach the end, or there’s some really effective testing strategy,” Armitage said.

He also said there’s evidence that indoor choir practices quickly spread the virus.

But that doesn’t mean musicians can’t gather virtually, he said, or a choir may choose to get creative and physically distance outside to sing, because outside at a distance is a safe environment with minimal spread.

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