75 years later Anne Frank's diary has been read by millions of school children.

Seventy five years ago in the Netherlands, a young, Jewish, girl opened her new diary - a birthday gift from a few days before - and sat down to pen these words: 

    "I hope I will be able to confide everything to you, as I have never been able to confide in anyone, and I hope you will be a great source of comfort and support."

The contents of Anne Frank's diary have now been read by millions of school children - bringing the realities of the holocaust to new generations. 

The thirteen-year-old and her family hid for more than two years, in a secret annex, before being discovered by German forces. Except for Anne's father, the entire frank family perished in concentration camps - Anne; dying only weeks before the liberation.

Joining us today to mark the 70th anniversary of the diary's publishing - and the 75th anniversary of Anne's first entry - is Fern Ruth Levy. 
She is the director of the Anne Frank Moral Courage Project of Cleveland.
 

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