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Policy Matters Says New Ohio Tax Policy Benefits the Rich

photo of a tax form
JO INGLES
/
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU
While the legislature touted an income tax cut, other tax changes could negate that benefit for lower income Ohioans.

Statehouse Republicans have championed recent tax changes, including the elimination of income taxes for those making less than $21,750 a year. But a new report by a liberal leaning think tank shows tax changes recently made by Ohio lawmakers will make the rich richer and will require lower middle class or poor Ohioans to possibly pay more.

Zach Schiller with Policy Matters said the latest reforms are continuing to shift tax burden from the wealthiest to the poorest Ohioans.

“People in the top one percent making more than $496,000 see an average tax cut whereas people, middle income people and low-income people, see not much change at all or a small increase.”

Schiller said the report took into account increases in the gas tax, application of internet taxes and the changes in what’s known as the LLC loophole, a mechanism small businesses often use.

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment. Jo started her career in Louisville, Kentucky in the mid 80’s when she helped produce a televised presidential debate for ABC News, worked for a creative services company and served as a general assignment report for a commercial radio station. In 1989, she returned back to her native Ohio to work at the WOSU Stations in Columbus where she began a long resume in public radio.