Homeschooling on the rise, due to pandemic and other factors

On the "Sound of Ideas,"  we discuss the rise of homeschooling in recent years, due in part to the pandemic. [Ground Picture/shutterstock]
On the "Sound of Ideas," we discuss the rise of homeschooling in recent years, due in part to the pandemic. [Ground Picture/shutterstock]
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When the modern homeschooling movement began in the early 1970s, it was regarded as a niche fringe movement. Only a few states explicitly allowed parents to homeschool their children at the time. By the late 70s, there were only 13,000 kids being homeschooled.

Over the next few decades, homeschooling grew steadily in popularity and was seen as a common alternative to traditional schooling, but remained a small minority.  By 2019, only 3 percent of students, or about 2.6 million were homeschooled, according to the US Census Bureau.

Then the pandemic hit. By 2020, that the number of homeschooled students jumped 63 percent and only dropped by 17 percent last year, according to data analyzed by the Associated Press. 

Along with the pandemic, the recent debate over what should be taught in schools, as well as the rise of school shootings could be causing parents to question where their children should receive their learning.

This hour on the "Sound of Ideas," we'll start by speaking to an expert investigating this trend as well as two homeschooling parents. 

Later, we learn about the life and works of famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who was the the master designer of public parks including New York's Central Park. 

Olmsted's life and work are the subject of a lecture this weekend organized by the Western Reserve Historical Society, which takes place at 1pm on August 6th at the Cleveland History Center.

Then, this week's Shuffle podcast delves into the music of the 90s. 

 

Guests: 

-Danielle Serna - Homeschool Assessor & Parent 
-Colleen Malloy - Homeschool Assessor & Parent
-Dr. Daniel Hamlin P.h.D, Professor of Educational Policy, University of Oklahoma & Reporter, Education Next 

-Laurence Cotton, Historian

-Brittany Nader, Producer, Shuffle Podcast 
-Rob Harvilla, Host, 60s Songs That Explain the 90s Podcast 

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