Author Elaine Weiss Discusses Battle For Women To Win The Right To Vote

National Women's Party demonstration in front of the White House in 1918. The banner protests Wilson's failure to support women's suffrage. [Everett Collection / Shutterstock]
National Women's Party demonstration in front of the White House in 1918. The banner protests Wilson's failure to support women's suffrage. [Everett Collection / Shutterstock]
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Former Vice President Joe Biden and California Sen. Kamala Harris will formally accept their nominations for president and vice president this week during the 2020 Democratic National Convention.

In any other presidential election year, the convention would bring thousands of visitors to the host city, in this case Milwaukee, Wisc., for meetings and convention speeches. But you can add national political conventions to the list of events upended by the coronavirus pandemic.

Democrats are gathering virtually this week for the convention. It is already being held a month later than previously planned.

First night speakers included Michelle Obama and former Democratic challenger, Bernie Sandersa  — a nod to the unity that Democrats hope to achieve.

Also speaking on opening night: former Ohio Republican governor John Kasich.

Kasich challenged Trump for the GOP nomination in 2016.  The two have rarely seen eye to eye politically.

While the DNC is being held virtually this year due to concerns about the coronavirus pandemic,  there are still meetings to be had and decisions to make by the delegates selected for the convention.

A northeast Ohio delegate discusses what it is like to take part in the virtual convention.

The summer of 2020 features something that echoes, mirrors, and in some cases repeats the summer of 1920.

America faces a presidential election, amid side battles that pit citizens, against each other.

Today it is Black Lives Matter and an immigration fight.

Then, it was women's right to vote and an immigration fight.

August 18 is the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave women equal voting rights.

A new book, "The Woman's Hour — The Great Fight to Win The Vote",  tells the story of the pitched battle to gain approval from the 36th state,  the number needed to approve the amendment.

 Author Elaine Weiss discusses her book and the battle to win the right to vote.   She will speaking --remotely--as the keynote speaker for Case Western Reserve University's Fall Convocation on Aug. 26. 

Gov. Mike DeWine announced a new effort by his cabinet to promote racial equity in state agency policy and plans. The governor's executive level response comes after the release of a final report from his Minority Health Strike Force. The group launched in April to seek solutions after a disproportionate number of minority Ohioans were impacted the coronavirus.

Black Ohioans make up less than 14 percent of Ohio's population but represent 25 percent of positive COVID-19 cases.

If you would like to read more about the work of the governor's Minority Health Strike Force, we have a link below.

Guests: 

Andy Chow, Reporter, Ohio Statehouse News Bureau 
Patricia Frost-Brooks, Delegate at Large, 2020 Democratic National Convention 
Elaine Weiss, Author, "The Woman's Hour"
Charles Modlin, MD, Founder and Director of the Minority Men's Health Center, Glickman Urological Institute, Executive Director of Minority Health, Cleveland Clinic 
Margaret Larkins-Pettigrew, MD, Chief Diversity Officer, University Hospitals 
 

For More Information:

Ohio Minority Health Strike Force Blueprint (PDF)

Case Western Reserve University Fall Convocation with Author Elaine Weiss  

Ohio Channel On-Demand Video

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