Cleveland Police Monitor Criticizes Equipment Plan

A Cleveland police zone car sits at a downtown intersection.
A Cleveland police zone car sits at a downtown intersection. [Tony Ganzer / ideastream]
Featured Audio

The monitor overseeing Cleveland’s police consent decree says his team cannot approve parts of the city’s proposed policy for body cameras, nor its plan for equipping officers.

In a court filing with the judge overseeing the consent decree, the monitoring team laid out its many criticisms of Cleveland’s equipment plan.

The team says the plan needs to set specific deadlines, rather than quarterly ones, and should clearly spell out who is responsible for doing what. Among other requirements, the monitor says Cleveland needs to come up with a plan for replacing its aging fleet of patrol cars. 

A separate court filing says the city should require police officers to wear body cameras when they’re wearing their city uniforms and gear for private jobs on the side.

Greg White, Cleveland’s consent decree coordinator, responded to the news in a written statement, saying the city remains committed to its settlement with the Justice Department.

“The city will continue our due diligence and good faith in the process moving forward,” he said.

The city and the monitor have a chance to talk this over more with a federal judge next month. They have a status conference scheduled for Jan. 6. 

Support Provided By

More Wcpn Schedule
More Wclv Schedule
Schedule
Donate
90.3 WCPN
WCLV Classical 104.9
NPR Hourly Newscast
The Latest News and Headlines from NPR
This text will be replaced with a player.
This text will be replaced with a player.
This text will be replaced with a player.