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The Sound of Ideas

The Sound of Ideas: Archive by Date

June 2010

Schools that Shine

Posted June 2, 2010
Topics: Education

Good news in urban education may be difficult to come by, but here's some: despite the challenges of high poverty high need communities, a handful of city schools across the state are outperforming just about everybody. Wednesday morning at 9, host Dan Moulthrop talks with leaders of successful urban schools around the state about how they do what they do. Hear what they have to say on the direction education reform should take.

How Strong is that Safety Net?

Posted June 3, 2010
Topics: Economy, Government/Politics, Health

Even though economists have taken to claiming the economy is rebounding, unemployment is still in double digits and nearly half of those out of work have been so for more than six months. That's more long-term unemployed than at any time in more than 60 years. What this means for starters, is that more and more Ohioans are falling back on charity care and Medicaid when it comes to their health needs, and it's just not clear the safety net can hold up. Thursday morning at 9, join host Dan Moulthrop for a check up on Ohio's health care safety net.

Reporters Roundtable

Posted June 4, 2010
Topics:

Plans for a temporary casino in Cleveland hit a snag in Columbus as lawmakers prepare rules for expanded gambling. Also, green energy practices take one step forward and one step backward in Northeast Ohio. Corruption indictments mount in Cuyahoga County, while the race for county executive attracts a former commissioner's candidacy. Lastly, a shocking video documenting animal cruelty foreshadows a statewide political battle. Friday morning at 9 join host Dan Moulthrop and reporters from across the state to discuss these and other stories from the week's news.

Grappling with Long Term Unemployment

Posted June 6, 2010
Topics: Economy, Help Wanted, Regional Economy/Business - Analysis and Trends, Government/Politics

The latest numbers about job growth in May belie a grim, persistent fact about the US economy: of the 15 million Americans still looking for work, almost half of those have been out of work for more than six months. Monday morning, economic analysts and some of the long term unemployed join host Dan Moulthrop to go behind all the numbers to look at the real implications of long term widespread unemployment in Ohio and across the nation.

May Levy Failures Bring June Layoffs at Schools

Posted June 8, 2010
Topics: Education, Government/Politics

Failed tax levies have school districts across the state facing some difficult choices, not the lest of which is staffing. Medina is letting 158 school employees go; 183 school personnel will be cut in Lorain; and Black River schools plan 25 layoffs. Tuesday morning, host Dan Moulthrop speaks to school district leaders across the region about the impact these cuts will have on education quality in the classroom and what else they're doing to balance the books.

Health-Tech Corridor

Posted June 9, 2010
Topics: Economy, Health

A new economic development collaboration in northeast Ohio got a kick start when medical imaging giant Phillips announced a $33 million investment last week. Baiju Shah of BioEnterprise thinks that the placement of the center in Cleveland speaks volumes about the connection and collaborative efforts between research and clinical institutions within the city, the state, and the country as a whole. Wednesday morning at 9, host Dan Moulthrop will discuss why supporters say this latest economic growth effort, the Health-Tech Corridor, will be successful compared to others that have sputtered.

Who Should Stand for Ohio?

Posted June 10, 2010
Topics: Arts and Culture, Government/Politics, Other, Community/Human Interest

The race is on to determine who will represent Ohio in National Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C. There are ten finalists, so, who has had a bigger impact? The inventor of the light bulb or the discoverer of the oral polio vaccine; the first in flight or the fleet of foot; the abolitionist or the astronaut? How do you decide? And what about the greats who didn't make the final cut? Voting ends Saturday, and we're talking about it Thursday morning.

Reporters’ Roundtable

Posted June 11, 2010
Topics: Economy, Government/Politics, Other, Community/Human Interest

With an $8 billion budget crisis looming in Ohio, leading thinkers have convened to figure out a solution, while the legislatively appointed group has yet to meet. Meanwhile, legislators push back on the Supreme Court's decision to allow eyeball estimates on speeding tickets, and the relief efforts begin to restore the tornado-ravaged village of Millbury. Friday morning, host Dan Moulthrop and reporters from across the state talk about those stories and the rest of the week's news.

Science Cafe: Illegal Drug Markets

Posted June 14, 2010
Topics: Economy, Government/Politics, Other, Community/Human Interest

The illegal drug trade is a part of American society that involves millions of people, all of whom are in it for their own reasons, and those reasons don't always center on addiction. Monday morning, host Dan Moulthrop and guests take up a scientific examination of the economy and the culture of illegal drug markets.

Prioritizing the Power of the Pedal

Posted June 15, 2010
Topics: Environment, Government/Politics, Other, Transportation

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood raised a lot of eyebrows this spring when he declared that bicycling and walking deserve a bigger share of government transportation dollars. Some called him crazy, an Ohio congressman suggested he was on drugs. And biking advocates all cheered. Tuesday morning, Secretary LaHood and others on what the DOT's new priorities could mean for Ohio; plus, an update on the much-anticipated Cleveland leg of Ohio's towpath trail.

Matters of Estate

Posted June 16, 2010
Topics: Government/Politics, Other, Aging/The Elderly, Community/Human Interest

A lapse in the Federal estate tax this year allows the descendants of Texas energy tycoon to keep his $9 billion fortune, but it also means the loss of more than $25 billion in tax revenue for the nation. This estate-tax holiday is an unplanned year long event, and in 2011, the tax returns with a vengeance. Wednesday morning, we tackle two bugaboos about estate planning: this current estate tax anomaly, and the way in which qualifying for Medicaid has changed the landscape of aging.

Energy and Risk

Posted June 17, 2010
Topics: Economy, Environment, Other, Energy, Technology, Shale

While an estimated 60,000 barrels a day of oil gush into the waters of the Gulf of Mexico, energy companies in Ohio remain eager to access the latest fuel deposit within the Rust Belt. Over 50 trillion cubic feet of natural gas can be found within the Marcellus Shale formation. It has the potential to be a gold mine, but at what risk to the surrounding community and environment? Thursday morning host Dan Moulthrop and guests discuss the science, the technology, and the risks of drilling for natural gas.

Reporters’ Roundtable--of Bike Paths and Children Services

Posted June 18, 2010
Topics: Arts and Culture, Government/Politics, Other, Community/Human Interest, Transportation

The Ohio Department of Transportation lowers the boom on a fondly-held dream of the cycling community. Prospects grow dimmer still for a bike lane on the new Innerbelt bridge. On the Sound of Ideas reporters roundtable, we'll assess that announcement, check in on campaign trail, and find out why the agency that's supposed to be protecting children in Cuyahoga County has cut costs and services beyond what was required by a county austerity mandate. Plus, local author David Giffels on why LeBron James' Akronite identity may be the most important part of his free agency decision.

The Double Dip Incentive

Posted June 21, 2010
Topics: Economy, Education, Government/Politics

Work hard, climb up the ladder, and then retire. That's the usual order for a working person. This is far from the case for those in the public sector, as retirement is often followed by an individual getting rehired for the same job while continuously collecting a pension. Although controversial, the practice is not illegal. Newspapers report that one in four school district superintendents do it. Can you blame them? Monday morning at 9, join host Dan Moulthrop for a conversation about the double dip incentive and its cost to tax payers.

Allergy 101

Posted June 22, 2010
Topics: Health, Attacking Allergies

An estimated 40 to 50-million Americans suffer from allergies whose symptoms can include runny nose, itchy eyes, lung conjestion, skin eruptions, and in rare cases, severe shock or even death. Among the culprits are pollen, pet dander, dust mites, cockroaches, some medicines and foods such as peanuts. Tomorrow on The Sound of Ideas, we'll explore the causes and treatment of allergies. Find out why more Americans have them and why many in other parts of the world don't. Join us for Allergy 101 Tuesday at 9:00 a.m. on 90.3.

Going Global

Posted June 23, 2010
Topics: Economy, Regional Economy/Business - Analysis and Trends, Regional Economy/Business - News

With the economy plummeting over the last few years, economists, business owners, and the government continue to look for new ways to secure steady growth. President Barack Obama believes that by doubling exports through his National Export Initiative plan, the economy will make a more rapid recovery. Although the idea sounds good in theory, it raises the question - is exporting really the answer for business in Ohio? This morning at 9:00, join host Dan Moulthrop for a discussion about exporting and the reason why it may be Ohio's transition into the new economy.

Are Electronic Medical Records Really Better?

Posted June 24, 2010
Topics: Government/Politics, Health, Other, Technology

Electronic medical records are supposed to be central to the future of health care reform. The theory is that doctors will become more efficient and doctors, patients and insurance companies will exchange information effortlessly. Two Case Western Reserve professors say that rosy future may come with a fair number of complications: privacy concerns top the list, and they could lead to a spike in the number of malpractice suits. Thursday morning, we'll look at the potential and the potential pitfalls of health care's brave, new world.

Reporters’ Roundtable

Posted June 25, 2010
Topics: Economy, Government/Politics, Other, Community/Human Interest

Eight months after voters decided to pitch an aging form of government in Cuyahoga County, one office holder has filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the new government. Meanwhile, the candidate pool in the races for the new county council and executive offices has firmed up with the passage of the filing deadline. Governor Strickland brings his reelection campaign to Cleveland in the midst of a surprisingly strange week in the gubernatorial race. Friday morning at 9, we talk about those stories and how the Lorain Morning Journal is reinventing the daily newspaper.

The Small Business Credit Crunch

Posted June 28, 2010
Topics: Economy, Help Wanted, Regional Economy/Business - Analysis and Trends, Regional Economy/Business - News, Government/Politics, Other, Community/Human Interest

Small businesses are supposed to lead the way out of the recession, but it's not easy without ready access to cash. Are banks being too stingy in the aftermath of the financial crisis? Or, are they just being prudent? We'll sort out the small business credit crunch and what it means to Northeast Ohio. Monday at 9 on 90.3.

Bargain Hunting 21st Century-Style

Posted June 29, 2010
Topics: Economy, Other, Miscellaneous, Technology

This long recession has turned more of us into bargain-hunters. Maybe it's not possible to make more money right now, but it is possible to keep more of it. With a small investment of time and the right strategy, it's possible to spin newspaper coupons into solid gold. You can point and click your way to thousands of bargains on the internet. And we'll find out why it pays to become a company's Facebook friend Tuesday morning at 9:00 as Regina Brett hosts The Sound of Ideas.

The Feuding Fathers

Posted June 30, 2010
Topics: Government/Politics

Last month during a commencement address, President Obama appealed for civility during these difficult partisan times. However, the shouts of "You Lie" and name calling is really nothing new. Steamy, polarized rhetoric has been around since the days of the founding fathers, who set off plenty of political fireworks, often aiming them at each other. Thomas Paine called President Washington treacherous and a hypocrite -- and that was just what he said in public. Join us for an early jump on the Independence Day celebration with a look back at the way things really were and comparing it to the political rancor of today.

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Every weekday at 9:00 AM (EST), The Sound of Ideas reports the news, explains the news, and sometimes makes news. The Cleveland Press Club awarded it “Best Radio Show” in Ohio and thousands daily find it to be an indispensable source of information about what’s most important to Northeast Ohioans.

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Funding for Ideas/Sound of Ideas comes from The George Gund Foundation, The Cleveland Foundation, Eaton Corporation Charitable Fund, the George W. Codrington Charitable Foundation, The Robert O. and Annamae Orr Family Foundation, and the Nord Family Foundation.