America Abroad: Judging the International Criminal Court

In the summer of 1998, 120 countries made a historic decision — to establish the International Criminal Court (ICC). The hope was to end the impunity enjoyed by the globe's worst perpetrators of crimes against the international community, but since then, the reality of international justice has been slow to materialize. Judging the International Criminal Court explored the halting attempts throughout the 20th century to create an international criminal court that culminated in the ICC. Co-hosts Ray Suarez and Deborah Amos began at ICC headquarters in The Hague, and moved on to Uganda and the ICC's ongoing prosecution of rebel leader Joseph Kony. Amos also traveled to the former Yugoslavia to gauge the effectiveness of the international tribunal prosecuting war crimes in the Balkans. Suarez and Amos ended by talking with international legal experts about America's controversial position on the ICC.

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