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Cleveland Museum of Art; Artist Johnny Coleman; East 4th St.

Applause
Thursday, October 18, 2012 at 7:30 pm
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Traversing through the Cleveland Museum of Art just got a bit easier thanks to the opening of their much anticipated Atrium. We step inside for a look at the cornerstone of CMA’s renovation along. And, artist Johnny Coleman takes us on a journey through Cleveland’s past. Plus, we take a look at how one of Cleveland’s shortest streets became one of the coolest spots in town.

The long detour through the basement of the Cleveland Museum of Art, to go from one gallery to another, is over. With the opening of a cornerstone to the museum's $350 million renovation - the new 39,000-square-foot Ames Family Atrium - access throughout the building has been restored. For a peek inside, we take a tour with Cleveland Museum of Art Director, David Franklin.

The opening of the Atrium isn't the only news coming out of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Also taking place is the opening of a couple new exhibits, and the start of the 2012 - 2013 Viva and Gala Performing Arts season. With details on that, we sit down with Griff Mann, Chief Curator at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Some say that we shouldn't "live in the past" and that we must always be looking forward in life. Artist, Educator and Cleveland Arts Prize winner Johnny Coleman ignores that warning with his art, as he wanders through the history of his forefathers, and through the history of Ohio. He's a sculptor and installation artist who's most comfortable among the artifacts and forgotten objects of our state's legacy in both the Underground Railroad, and the Great Migration. He leaves his comfort zone to spend a little time in the present, discussing his latest exhibit at the Sculpture Center, Procession: Song for the Underground Railroad at the Sculpture Center of Cleveland.

In the 1830's the 450-foot passageway that would become East 4th Street was a quiet residential neighborhood. Within a decade, the street would become a bustling center for business and entertainment interests, and within a century, that bustle would fade away to a dim memory. Hard to believe that an area now considered one of the coolest spots in Cleveland, was, at one point in its history described as a seedy side street. It's all in Alan Dutka's new book, "East Fourth Street: the Rise, Decline and Rebirth of an Urban Cleveland Street." He joins us on Applause.

Guests

David Franklin, Director, Cleveland Museum of Art
Griff Mann, Chief Curator at the Cleveland Museum of Art
Johnny Coleman, Associate Professor at Oberlin College
Alan Dutka, author, East Fourth Street: the Rise, Decline and Rebirth of an Urban Cleveland Street,"

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