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Democrats Poised To Pick Up Seats In Final House Tally

Posted: November 20, 2012

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Two weeks after Election Day, it appears the partisan makeup of the new House of Representatives will be 234 Republicans and 201 Democrats, although the outcome is not yet official in two states. That would be a gain of eight seats for the minority Democrats.

Two weeks after Election Day, the results are almost final. It appears the U.S. House of Representatives will be filled with 234 Republicans and 201 Democrats, though the outcome is not yet official in two states.

Two weeks after Election Day, the results are almost final. It appears the U.S. House of Representatives will be filled with 234 Republicans and 201 Democrats, though the outcome is not yet official in two states. Brendan Hoffman

Two weeks after Election Day, it appears the partisan makeup of the new House of Representatives will be 234 Republicans and 201 Democrats, although the outcome is not yet official in two states.

One result that did become clear on Tuesday: Republican Rep. Allen West, a Tea Party favorite, conceded to Democrat Patrick Murphy in Florida.

Unresolved races remain in Louisiana and North Carolina.

A new district map forced two Republican incumbents to run against each other in Louisiana. They will meet in a runoff on Dec. 8.

In North Carolina, Democratic incumbent Mike McIntyre appears to have won a ninth term in the district that includes counties around Cape Fear and Wilmington. But just 655 votes separate him from Republican challenger David Rouzer. That's within the 1 percent margin that permits a recount, and on Tuesday, Rouzer exercised his right to ask for one.

The recount begins Monday.

If McIntyre holds, the Democrats will have gained ground on the majority Republicans. Not enough to take control, as they would have hoped, but more than had seemed possible in the runup to Election Day.

"In the waning days of the campaign, there was some optimism on the part of Republicans [that] they could actually add to their majority," says David Wasserman, who analyzes the House of Representatives for the nonpartisan Cook Political Report. "What ended up happening was a mild success for Democrats. They ended up picking up a net gain of eight seats in the House and getting to 201 seats."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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