Jul. 23, 2014   66°F   School Closings
Listen Live WCPN / WCLV
ideastream
Mission 4
Values 1
Values 2
Values 3
Vision 3
Vision 4
Vision 5
Values 4
Values 5
Values 6
Vision 1
Vision 2

Choose a station:

90.3 WCPN
WCLV 104.9
WVIZ/PBS

Choose a station:

90.3 WCPN
WCLV 104.9
WVIZ/PBS

Looking at the Civil War Through Lincoln’s Eyes

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 8:06 PM

Share on Facebook Share Share on Twitter Tweet
The 'Gettysburg Portrait' was taken by Alexander Gardner just days before the Gettysburg Address. (Courtesy JCU)

Tuesday marked the 150th anniversary of Lincoln's Gettysburg address, and the day was observed across the country with many examinations of the famous speech and why it has endured all these years. But, ideastream's David C. Barnett reports that John Carroll University has a different way of looking at that history.

You probably know the photo.  The President’s face is lined and tired. It was taken during the heart of the Civil War, just days before Abraham Lincoln was to deliver one of his most famous speeches.  In fact, the image has come to be known as “the Gettysburg Portrait”.

CHARLES ZAROBILA:  You can tell that a lot was weighing on this man’s mind when this picture was taken.

John Carroll University’s Special Collections curator, Charles Zarobila unveiled that picture and nearly 60 other rare artifacts, yesterday, which were donated by Robert Heltzel, a local collector of Lincoln memorabilia and a member of the school’s Board of Directors.  Among the other items are paintings, documents and books, including a bound program outlining the ceremony that day at Gettysburg.  Zarobila says the keynote event listed was an oration by noted politician Edward Everett.

CHARLES ZAROBILA: He spoke for two hours, and most of the book is given over to his speech.  Lincoln’s speech appears on page 40 of this book, almost as a kind of footnote.  And there it is, for virtually the first time, printed in book form.

And, ironically, it was Everett’s long-winded talk that ended up being “little noted nor long-remembered” in the historical wake of Lincoln’s elegant prose.

That book, and all the other items in the Heltzel collection are available for public viewing at the JCU library, where you can look for yourself into the eyes of a weary President trying to hold his country together.

Tags

Arts and Culture, History, Photography, Community/Human Interest, Education, Government/Politics

Leave a Comment

Please follow our community discussion rules when composing your comments.