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Cuyahoga Republican Chair Calls for Bipartisanship

Friday, July 30, 2010 at 3:46 PM

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Addressing the Cleveland City Club Friday, Cuyahoga County Republican Party Chairman Rob Frost laid out what he called a conservative approach to reform. He said the county's future would require bipartisan cooperation, not one-party rule. ideastream's intern Nick Castele reports.

Frost chastised county Democrats, saying that more than a decade of local dominance had bred a tolerance for corruption. He said the new government in Cuyahoga County would allow more Republicans to win seats in office.

FROST: “I feel very strongly you may very likely have a Republican county executive in Matt Dolan. You’re going to likely have some Democrats who are going to win some seats on this county council. For the next two years, you’re going to have a Democrat county prosecutor. So we’re going to have this divided government. What I would hope they would do as elected officials is put aside any partisan differences.”

In addition to county government reform, Frost also talked about changes he’d like to see in education - such as more access to charter schools and school vouchers.  And he criticized the terms of the new contract Cleveland teachers negotiated with school CEO Eugene Sanders.

FROST: “CEO Sanders’ hands are tied by Ohio law and union leaders’ intransigence on the issue of tenure. We have excellent teachers in our schools. Many high quality educators; however, forward-thinking administrators like Gene Sanders cannot-simply cannot remove ineffective teachers.”

On the issue of criminal justice, Frost said he supports easing up on sentencing for lower level offenses and more emphasis on rehabilitation, arguing it would cost the state less than long-term incarceration.

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